Friday, March 4, 2011

Suk Addition

My customers approached me with the idea of adding about a 1200 square foot addition to their existing 1100 square foot bungalow.  Fortunately, because their property was so large, they did not really have any issues with property set-backs which allowed more choices for lateral designs rather than having to go vertical with a second story.

They had considered several different options, but, after hiring an architect to design and draw up a set of working plans, I set to work lining up the many different sub-trades that I would need to help us with this project.

The initial challenge was to remove the existing attached garage from the South end of the house without damaging the remaining house structure.

This is how the house looked before we started the project with the double car garage attached to the main house sharing the same roof line.

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While waiting for the building permit application to be approved, some preliminary work could be tackled including removing trees that would be in the way of the addition.

Notice what it looked like after the home owner removed the original brick veneer from around the side and back of the garage.  These bricks are to be re-used around the front of the new addition to add aesthetic appeal and continuity in design.

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This is what the garage looked like after we removed all unnecessary wiring, doors, windows, stripped all the shingles off the roof, removed all the plaster and gyproc from the exterior of the garage and cut through the last wood beams joining the house and garage.  The back-hoe carefully broke out the bottom supports to weaken the South side of the garage.

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As you can see, it was quite a simple matter for the huge machine to just pull the garage over without damaging the existing house or the brick chimney.  It helps to work with a company like Cotton Construction who employ qualified workers that know what they are doing!

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This is what the remaining house looked like after the garage materials were dragged away.  Notice the house roof structure still intact and the chimney still standing!

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Another challenge that we faced was what to do with the old cistern that was located right beside the original garage.  If we had to remove it, the resulting disturbed soil would cause a major problem in terms of providing adequate support for the footings for the new foundation walls.  Fortunately, an engineer friend Erik Quist provided the necessary alternative, namely filling the cistern in with a special type of concrete so that there would not be any issues with proper support.  This picture shows where the new footings are to go nicely straddling the old cistern!  Notice too what a great job Cotton Construction did digging out for the new foundation.

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As you can see, the forms are all set up and ready to pour the footings.  Notice what the cistern looks like now that it has been pumped out and then filled with the special concrete material.

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The footings are all poured and ready to begin setting up for the concrete walls after the weeping tile and gravel base is added around the footings.

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The gravel is spread to cover the exposed ground in between the footings by a stone-slinger truck.  I am always amazed at how well the operator can place the stone including maintaining a uniform thickness!  Once again Cotton Construction demonstrated that their workers are up to the challenge.

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The same view after the foundation walls are set up and ready to pour.

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This is what the foundation looked like after the walls were poured, the forms stripped off and the damp-proofing and Delta membrane installed.  This design is for a crawl space to match the wall height of the original house (which also has a crawl space).

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Now we can have the back-filling done so that working on the framing is easier and safer than having to climb over large trenches around the foundation.

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One more necessary step was to install a new 3000 gallon concrete cistern because we had to abandon the old cistern (remember that it is now buried under the new addition floor).

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The arrival of the framing materials from Rockett Lumber heralds the next phase of the project.

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This view shows how fast the floor areas are framed up (this was all done the first day by mid afternoon after Gerrit Vanderwier and his framing crew arrived).

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The second day of framing saw most of the walls going up which really helps to define the shape of the new addition.

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Now the roof trusses are installed which define the new roof lines and how they tie into the existing house roof.

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The completed new roof structure covered with plywood really shows the creative features that the architect wanted to incorporate.  This view is taken from the roof area of the existing house looking out towards the new garage roof line.

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The next step required the delivery of the new shingles from Herman’s.

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The crew from Baron Roofing arrived and by the end of the first day had most of the new shingles installed to cover the roof areas of the new addition.

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The second day of roofing involved the old shingles stripped off and new ones installed to tie in with the reworked roof line of the new addition.  We were blessed with dry weather for this work up until the end of the second day just as the crew were finishing up the final details.

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The next task was to remove several truck loads of excess soil left over from the original excavation.  Fortunately the home owner had room on his own property to dump it so that extra disposal fees were not required.

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After the excess soil was removed, the new driveway areas could be cut in and then gravelled so that normal vehicles would not get stuck trying to drive up to the new addition area to work on the remaining phases of the job.  Notice the installation of the Typar building wrap is almost finished in preparation for the next phase of the project.

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As mentioned, the next part of the job involves installing all the windows and doors into the addition.  My hardworking friend Patrick Vermolen has things under control in that department.  Notice what a nice open feeling there is with the “scissor” trusses we used in the new family room ceiling.

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Number one son Ian taking care of reframing the old door opening between the addition and the original house so that there would be a larger opening to enhance the practical access between both the old and the new areas.

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While the other work was going on, Cotton Construction turned their attention to preparing the new garage floor for pouring concrete.  As it was currently well below freezing outside, that involved many hours (and many tanks of propane) to keep things from freezing up.

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The resulting concrete work was well worth the effort because it turned out just great.  The eerie glow from the sun back-lighting the insulated tarp shows the finisher hard at work towards the end of the day.

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If you recall from earlier on in this project, the home owner wanted to re-use the bricks that he salvaged from around the original garage.  Here you can see that Wyndam Masonry has been very busy installing those same bricks along with new limestone sills to finish off the top edges.  This was a real challenge especially considering that winter was still around to challenge the outdoor work progress.

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Gary certainly had his work cut out for him the day that he rebuilt the original chimney.  You have to love winter right Gary?

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One of the challenges that we had was providing another method of heating their new addition as well as their original house.  Because there was not any natural gas available in their area, my HVAC contractor Paterson-Lange suggested that we install a high-efficiency propane furnace and tankless water heater.  In order to make that work, we also had to install a new outdoor 1000 litre propane tank and underground supply line to the house.  Here you see one of the staff of Free Gas installing the new tank.  Incidentally, the original house was heated primarily by electric baseboard heaters and supplemented by a wood-burning fireplace.

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Along with many other energy savings upgrades, we had Miller Insulation install new spray urethane foam to all the inside walls of the crawl space.  This is one of the approved materials that qualify for the now-defunct government energy grants. 

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Here you can see Cotton Construction pouring the front porch slab.  It was also a challenge for them because we had to heat it up enough so that the metal pan support would not freeze while it was well below freezing outside.

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Here you can see my friend Patrick Vermolen hard at work cutting in a decorative gable vent that our customer wanted installed.  Notice also how the vertical board and batten vinyl siding work is shaping up.  Because of the location of this home being across the road from an open field meant that it was almost always windy and cold.  For the trades that worked outside during the project, they struggled with keeping warm at times.

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Here is how the same vent opening looks from the inside.  Smile for the camera Patrick!

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Another major milestone was accomplished today when Miller Insulation installed the insulation inside the main floor areas of the addition.  Notice also the installation of sound-deadening Roxul insulation in the wall dividing the new family room from the new master bedroom.

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The next phase of the job involved installing the drywall and then taping and finishing in preparation for final painting work.  Here you see one of the crew from Binsley Drywall company hard at work taping the vaulted ceiling area of the addition.  This is one of those jobs that not everybody appreciates how much skill is really involved to obtain just the right amount of compound installed so that you don’t have to sand off too much material afterwards.

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This view shows how the reclaimed brick looks after being reinstalled at the front of the house.  The siding work is progressing well also.  The vertical board and batten style siding really suits this renovation.

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Now with the siding work completed and the decorative gable vents installed the front of the home is almost complete except for facia board and eves trough…….and some landscaping after the snow melts.

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The same finishing work is required here on the east facing portion of the addition.

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They say that the job is not done until the garbage is taken away………the portable toilet that has served many people so well for several months is no longer needed.  The dedicated crew from Modern Corporation did a great job of taking care of this for all the trades even in the coldest weather.  Thanks Guys!

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LIST OF TRADES & SUPPLIERS USED ON THIS PROJECT

ARCHITECT – Rijus Home & Design Ltd. 905-701-1110

ENGINEER – Quist Engineering 905-971-9334

DEMOLITION/EXCAVATION/FOUNDATION/FLATWORK – Cotton Inc. 905-262-2000

WASTE REMOVAL – Cotton Inc. 905-262-2000

FRAMING MATERIALS/TRUSSES – Rocket Lumber (Fonthill Lumber) 905-892-2641

FRAMING CREW – Huge Construction 905-957-9179

ROOFERS – Baron Roofing 905-384-4000

INSULATION – Miller Insulation 905-680-1160

HVAC – Paterson-Lange 905-732-0600

PROPANE – Free Gas 905-892-3377

PLUMBING – Gyugyei Plumbing 905-735-0386

ELECTRICAL – A-Tech Electrical 289-213-8881

DRYWALL – Binsley Drywall 905-321-7050

WINDOWS/SIDING/SOFFIT/FACIA/TROUGH – Patrick Vermolen 905-941-0516

ENTRY DOORS – Niagara Prehung Doors 905-892-8372

GARAGE DOOR – Regional Doors and Hardware 905-684-8161

SHINGLES – Herman’s Building Centres 905-641-2000

MASONARY – Wyndam Masonry 905-562-7591

SANITATION – Modern Corporation 905-262-6000

INTERIOR TRIM/FLOORING/PAINTWORK – by homeowner

PROJECT START DATE OCT. 12/2010 – COMPLETION DATE FEB. 23/2011

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